One Hope United Presents Its Second Annual Duck Derby

One Hope United Kicks Off  “Where’s Waddle” Campaign for Second Annual Duck Derby.

What is a Duck Derby? Duck Derby puts the “fun” in fundraising! OHU’s Duck Derby benefits One Hope United and Florida’s Osceola County Public Schools. As our second year participating in the Duck Derby, supporters from OHU and the OSPS system will race to get as many ducks as possible prior to Derby Day on February 1, 2020.

You can purchase ducks for $5 each or in fun packs where you can buy more at one time. Each duck adopted directly enhances OHU’s services  to create limitless lives for the children and families we serve in Florida and in communities across multiple states. $1 goes to OCPS for every duck that gets adopted and the remaining proceeds will go to OHU.

The Duck Derby also benefits families in Osceola County, sharing the joy and excitement of a friendly duck race, but also championing a philanthropic cause that supports local children and families.

Before the big race, our ducks will be traveling all around the world in our search of “Where’s Waddle”. Stay tuned for their latest whereabouts by following their journey on our Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram pages.

 

 

 

About One Hope United
One Hope United is a private human service organization that offers a diverse array of prevention, intervention and community-based programs including early education, foster care, adoption, residential, and other support services. What began in 1895 as a children’s home in Chicago now serves 9,000 children and families each year in Illinois, Wisconsin, Missouri, and Florida and employs nearly 800 passionate and talented professionals. For more information, please visit http://www.onehopeunited.org.

One Hope United Hosts ‘Foster Boy’ Screening and Talkback

One Hope United partnered last week with attorney and producer/writer Jay Paul Deratany to host a screening of his new film, Foster Boy, followed by a talkback and reception.

Foster Boy tells the story of an African American teenager who was physically and sexually abused by an older foster care teen after the two were placed in the same home by a for-profit foster care company.

View the event photos on our Facebook page here

As a nonprofit agency providing foster care services, One Hope United hosted the screening to share the powerful film with its supporters and bring attention to the danger that arises when organizations put profits ahead of children’s well-being.

“A child is not a commodity,” Deratany told a capacity audience at the Pritzker Military Museum and Library. “You have to give a kid a chance. You have to give them some hope.”

The movie was inspired by three true foster care abuse cases in which Deratany was involved and stars Matthew Modine as the attorney and Academy Award-winner Louis Gossett Jr. as the judge. Basketball legend Shaquille O’Neal, a child advocate himself who took a special interest in the movie’s topic, is an executive producer.

In the talkback, moderator Charles A. Montorio-Archer, President and CEO of One Hope United, asked Deratany about the role of the arts in raising awareness about this and other serious topics.

“We have to tell stories of abuse, we have to tell stories about racial prejudice, we have to tell stories that bring us back together as a country, that unite us again,” Deratany answered. We have to come together to conquer some of the problems that we have.”

Melissa Webster, One Hope United’s Executive Director of Residential and Day Treatment Services, spoke on the panel about the film’s realistic depiction of the effects of trauma on youth.

“One thing that trauma robs from kids is that sense that they have a future,” said Webster. “A big part of what we do is help them find that hope so they can start to see that they’re going to have a future as well, that they have a chance to have a different kind of life.”

“One Hope United does some great work,” Deratany said. “We have to give recognition to a great group like this, because we need to continue to fight for our kids.”

To support children in foster care who have experienced trauma, you may donate to One Hope United here.

 

More Information

Become a One Hope United foster parent.

Visit the Foster Boy website.

Read an interview with Jay Paul Deratany.

Watch a video from the event.

Pathfinders Helps Preschooler Heal From Exposure To Domestic Abuse

Innovative therapeutic program helps preschool children cope with difficult emotions and lead more positive lives.

When Lucy*, 5, first arrived at One Hope United’s Elgin Child & Family Resource Center, she was extremely sensitive to loud noises, covering her ears and experiencing severe anxiety whenever another child would cry out—which, at a child care center, can be often. When she was frustrated or experienced even the slightest discipline, “she would scream at the top of her lungs, as if she were afraid for her life,” pounding on the wall and stomping her feet, her mother, Krista*, explains. “I knew right away I needed help.”

Lucy’s behavior was related to traumas she had experienced as a very young child. She witnessed physical abuse by her biological father toward her mother, and while he never physically harmed Lucy, when she would have tantrums as a 2- and 3-year-old, hewould rush toward her with raised fists in an attempt to make herto stop. “She went through a lot,” Krista says.

While those traumas were fortunately in the past, their effects were disrupting Lucy’s education and potentially that of her classmates. In addition, adverse childhood experiences can have long-term effects on children’s health, behavior, and life potential. It’s for children like Lucy that One Hope United began Pathfinders, a unique program that combines aspects of our family counseling programs with our early childhood education centers to help children cope with negative emotions and adopt healthier behaviors.

Pathfinders therapist Tara Cassidy says the program is a collaboration with the child, their family, and their teacher.

Sometimes it’s the teacher who notices an issue and alerts Tara, who will then engage the child’s family to offer support, which is covered through private insurance or Medicaid. She will observe and engage with the child in the classroom, with their family, and in individual sessions, and craft a treatment plan that often involves the family due to the child’s young age. The evidence-based treatment is called Attachment, Self-Regulation, and Competency.

One boy who was predisposed to depression learned deep breathing and created a book of coping skills. “On one page he put all the things that he liked to do, so if he was feeling down, he could just go in his book and see, ‘I could go ride my bike,I could go take a walk,’ things that would help him get out of a low mood,” Tara says.

Another child who struggled with tantrums learned to express her emotions and tell her loved ones why she was upset. Her coping skills included coloring and walking the dog—a therapy dog that was part of her treatment. Tara also taught her family to recognize when the girl needed help and step in with an activity. “Because they’re so young, sometimes they don’t just say, ‘I need to go use a coping skill,’” she says.

It’s important to make the sessions and treatment fun so the kids will want to continue. “They may think we’re just playing, but we’re really doing therapy,” Tara says. “If they don’t have fun, they won’t want to be there, and they won’t learn as much. People learn better when they’re enjoying it.”

Krista says that Lucy is “a completely different little girl” as a result of Pathfinders. Through the program, Lucy has increased her self-esteem, developed confidence, grown more talkative,made more friends, and no longer covers her ears at loud noises. “I can’t say enough how amazing the program has been for my daughter. It changed her life and gave her the chance for a much better life altogether.”

Pathfinders is also offered One Hope United’s Aurora Early Learning Center and Joliet Early Learning Center, and could expand to more, which Tara would be happy to see. “This is the first program I’ve been in where the kids are so little, and it’s great,” she says. “The earlier you help them, the better off they’ll be.”

*Name has been changed.

One Hope United Honored at 2019 Illinois Centennial Awards

JACKSONVILLE, IL – As we prepare to enter our 125th year,  One Hope United was honored at Illinois State Historical Society’s 35th annual Centennial Business Awards luncheon at Jacksonville’s Hamilton’s Catering and banquet hall facility.

“It is an honor and privilege to recognize and celebrate the achievement of these unique businesses and organizations that have achieved the centennial milestone,” said ISHS executive director William Furry. “Fewer than 10 percent of all corporations survive 100 years, and those that do have done so with great sacrifice. They have also persevered economic downturns, recessions, personal losses, and enormous changes in the industry. Their resilience, and not a little luck, made all the difference. To each of them, we extend our best wishes for the next 100 years.”
Representatives from each of the recipients Centennial Award businesses received a certificate with the ISHS Centennial Seal signed by President Dan Monroe and Executive Director William Furry. Tim Snowden, Executive Director for Community Based Family Services, accepted the award on One Hope United’s behalf.

Other businesses that received the Centennial Business Award for 2019 are:

Schmale Insurance Company
Loyola Press
American Legion Post 279
Bound to Stay Bound Books
Hamilton’s Catering
Routt Catholic High School
Western Illinois University
Petersburg Monument Company
Blessing-Rieman College of Nursing and Health Sciences
Rock Island Public Library
The Village of Rochester
Illinois Education Association
Cover Insurance Company
Stark County Old Settlers Association
Wyoming Monument Company
Chisolm Boyd, & White Company
State Bank of Lakes
J.C. Schultz Enterprises, Inc.
Egyptian Workplace Partners
U.A.S. Local 99 Plumbers and Pipefitters
Buena Vista National Bank
House of Glunz
Fox River Grove
Mason County Democrat
Zenith Electronics, L.L.C.
Roseview Flowers
H.J. Eppel and Company, Inc.
Anderson’s Candy Company, Inc.
Scot Forge
Randolph Mutual Insurance

About One Hope United

One Hope United is a private human service organization that offers a diverse array of prevention, intervention and community-based programs including early education, foster care, adoption, residential, and other support services. What began in 1895 as a children’s home in suburban Chicago now serves 10,000 children and families each year in Illinois, Wisconsin, Missouri, and Florida and employs nearly 800 passionate and talented professionals. For more information, please visit http://www.onehopeunited.org.

75 Champaign-Area Youth to Receive Foster Care Services Through One Hope United

ABOVE: (From Left to Right) One Hope United Champaign employees Carla Bradford, Elizabeth Stonum, Karen Kietzmann, Katie Arnold, Laken Waltz and Myriam Molina

CHAMPAIGN, IL – One Hope United is now providing foster care services to 75 youth in four Central Illinois Counties,  to ensure they are properly cared for in their transitional foster home and to help them achieve a permanent home, whether they are returned their birth parents, another guardian, or an adoptive family. The new services cover the counties of Champaign, Ford, Iroquois, and Vermilion.

One Hope United, with offices throughout Illinois, Missouri, Wisconsin and Florida, is widely respected throughout Central Illinois as a high-quality provider of foster care services, including its strong track record of helping youth find permanent homes. In nearby Charleston, where One Hope United has provided services for decades, the organization currently exceeds the goals set by child welfare officials to find permanent families for youth in foster care.

To encourage potential foster parents to learn about One Hope United, the organization is welcoming the community to an Open House on Friday, August 2nd, from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. at 1902 Fox Drive, Suite E, Champaign, Illinois (217-850-0500). Community members are invited to drop in, meet the staff, enjoy light refreshments, and learn more about the services, including the process of becoming a foster parent or family.

“There is a shortage of foster parents nationwide, and we want to encourage more individuals and couples to become foster moms and dads,” said Charles A. Montorio-Archer, President and CEO of One Hope United.  “Our new presence in the Champaign area reflects our vision: For every child and family, a life without limits,” said Montorio-Archer.

“Foster parents play an indispensable role in helping our children reach permanency,” says Lindsey Hoover, director of One Hope United’s foster care programs in Charleston and now Champaign. “Through their patience, love and compassion, they provide a safe and secure environment for the children we serve.” Foster parents may also be a permanency option themselves, Hoover adds, as foster care can be a path to adoption.

Champaign-area individuals and families interested in fostering who cannot attend the open house should contact One Hope United’s licensing manager, Myriam Molina, at mmolina1@onehopeunited.org or 217-508-6388.

To get acquainted with area residents, One Hope United employees, supporters, and youth will participate in Run Mahomet on Saturday, August 3, 2019. For the second straight year, the “Run Hope United” team will run the race benefitting the Mahomet Area Youth Club.

“Last year’s ‘Run Hope United’ was a great way for the One Hope United community to bond while supporting a cause that we all believe in – children,” says Tim Snowden, Executive Director of Community-Based Family Services, which include foster care. “We are thrilled to be participating in Run Mahomet for the second year, this time as a service provider in the community.”

Race attendees and spectators are encouraged to say hello to the Run Hope United team and learn how they can support area children through the organization’s foster care program.

About One Hope United

One Hope United is a private human service organization that offers a diverse array of prevention, intervention and community-based programs including early education, foster care, adoption, residential, and other support services. What began in 1895 as a children’s home in suburban Chicago now serves 9,000 children and families each year in Illinois, Wisconsin, Missouri, and Florida and employs nearly 800 passionate and talented professionals. For more information, please visit http://www.onehopeunited.org.

Florida Case Manager Named Reunification Hero!

Victor Sims, Case Manager Lead in Florida, was recognized as a Reunification Hero by the American Bar Association Children and Law.

Sims was nominated by one of his clients who gave him credit with her reunification with her children. She recalled how “he brought my kids home when no one knew a way to make it happen” and said that “he has continually been a champion for change.”

His experience in the child welfare system began while spending the first 11 years of his life in foster care. Fortunately, Sims was adopted into a loving family and his experience in foster care is what motivated him to pursue a career as a case manager at One Hope United in Florida. While reunification was not possible for him and his parents, today Sims makes reunification his priority with every family that he serves.

He prioritizes strengthening  families’ so children can return home safely as soon as possible. Sims strives to understand the root causes of the parents’ problems so that they overcome their barriers to success. He does an excellent job of using innovative techniques that will help families continually succeed after their case has ended.

Read Full Article Here on America Bar Association

Discover more #NationalReunificationMonth stories on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram

Florida Couple Adopts Two Kids Into Their Forever Family

Executive Pastor Chad Dillon Was Certain He Didn’t Want To Become A Foster Parent. His Wife Adriane Was Equally Sure She Did.

After seven years of trying to have a biological child, the Dillon’s longed for a family and had always had a desire to adopt—being able to provide a child with a forever family. But they weren’t completely in agreement about fostering children. In early 2014, they enrolled in PRIDE classes. 

The Dillon’s took the classes with another couple, their best friends, and since PRIDE covers both adoption and fostering in their county, participants could choose to do either, or both. During the classes, the couple had heard horrific stories about children in their community being abused and neglected, in which Chad came to realize that his hesitancy to foster was nothing short of selfishness where the attention was on him and not on the children who need and deserve to be loved unconditionally. His attitude had completely changed and he told his wife,

“We will foster as long as we can agree on one thing—to put the best interest of every child that comes into our care above our own and the moment that we cannot do that, we get out so that we are never a part of the problem.”

So, after this realization, he and his wife without hesitation continued their classes and were ready to enter the world of fostering where they were ready to embrace every child that came their way with love and as their own. They received their license on November 4, 2014. To their shock, they received a call on the same day about a seven-day-old baby girl who needed a foster home. They said yes, and on November 6, 2014, they welcomed Hilary Rose into their loving arms, and adding her older brother Christopher into their home in June of 2016. 

The Dillon’s have fostered two other children to-date as well—but they knew they wanted to do more for parents like them. In January 2016, Chad assisted in the launch of a brand new foster and adoptive children’s association in their county and was quickly introduced to OHU. They immediately felt welcomed by the staff, especially the Executive Director for their county—Eva Horner. Chad and Eva have had several discussions about ways to improve the system of care in Florida, especially their county. In April of 2014, Chad was voted in as the President of the Osceola Foster and Adoptive Children’s Association. To date, they have seen over 50 people attend and recently have had 17 foster and/or adoptive families become official members. The monthly association meetings are hosted at their church—Freedom Life Church. 

As President, Chad has addressed issues of foster care parent retention, co-parenting, creating stronger relationships among licensing agencies, the Department of Children and Families, and foster/adoptive parents, as well as changing the reputation and perception of the foster care system. “People ultimately fear the unknown,” says Chad, “But we believe the work we’re doing in Osceola County can spread throughout the state of Florida and change people’s hearts and minds about child welfare.” “The lack of awareness is one of the biggest issues we face. People simply need to see the need and be given the opportunity to meet it, but it has to be presented in a positive way and must come from a heart of compassion because people gravitate towards passion.” He strives to motivate and encourage anyone who involves themselves in the child welfare system to have and keep the right heart motive, where the focus is on making sure that every decision is about the child’s best interest and never the adult’s (whether foster parent, bio-parent, bio-relative, agency worker, adoptive parent, etc.). 

Chad lost his own father on November 6, 2002, exactly 22 years to the day that he and his wife welcomed their first foster child (who became their forever daughter) into their home. Now that day takes on a whole new meaning. Another significant day in the Dillon’s life? September 12, 2016, the day Hilary Rose and Christopher David were officially adopted into their forever.

Supporters Gather to Share ‘Why I Have Hope’ at Hope In Action Fundraiser

One Hope United thanks the 250 supporters who attended Hope In Action:Why I Have Hope gala on Friday, May 3rd, at the Hilton Chicago and who helped drive opportunity and impact for children and families! We’re very appreciative for their presence and immense support that has been shown to our organization. We are even closer to fulfilling our vision: For every child and family, life without limits.
Dr. Charles A. Montorio-Archer, President & CEO

“In this work of human dignity, human respect and human acknowledgement, the mission building and mission movement work at One Hope United requires that we draw community closer,” Dr. Charles A. Montorio-Archer said.  “You are our community. And by being with us – together with us – this community will empower others to live Life Without Limits. Join me, join us, Turn Hope Into Action.”

Among the highlights of the night were the presentations of the Ermit Finch Impact Award to Nannie Crudup (below), The Chairwoman’s Award to Patrick Kingston, The President’s Award to Todd Schultz, and the Turn Hope Into Action award to Marc D. Smith.
Nannie Crudup received the Ermit Finch Award
Check out the sights and sounds of Hope In Action: Why I Have Hope, featuring music by special guest Mario Bonds.

Visit us on Facebook to view all of the fun photos from the night. Be sure to tag yourself and your friends!

A big thank you to all who came out to hear “Why I Have Hope” stories and helped make the evening such a success. Didn’t have the chance to raise your paddle at Hope In Action 2019? You can still support OHU by clicking here.

One Hope United Names Lake Villa Campus for Ermit L. Finch

ABOVE Ermit L. Finch (right) is joined by his wife, Jonni Miklos (left), and One Hope United Board Chair Theresa A. Dear (center) at the ceremony to dedicate the Lake Villa campus in his name.

Finch lived on campus from 1948 to ’51 and became first former client to serve on One Hope United’s Board.

One Hope United has named its Lake Villa, Ill., campus after a former resident and current board member Ermit L. Finch. The Board of Directors hosted a ceremony to dedicate the Ermit L. Finch Campus at Lake Villa on Friday, April 26, attended by the Board, staff of the campus, friends and family of Finch, and Lake Villa’s Mayor James McDonald.

Read about the ceremony and Finch’s life in the Lake County News-Sun.

Finch took up residence at One Hope United campus (then Central Baptist Children’s Home) in 1948, following a harrowing childhood in Arkansas. (Watch The Impact of Ermit Finch video below.)

Finch was born in Little Rock, Ark., in 1934 to a furniture salesman and homemaker. Both parents contracted tuberculosis in the 1940s and went to sanatoriums, after which he saw his father once a week and communicated with his mother, who was sent to New Mexico, only by letter. Her death in 1945 precipitated his father’s death less than 30 days later.

After a short time living and working on his uncle’s farm, where Finch acquired the nickname “Cotton”—the farm’s signature crop—for his white hair, Finch transferred to an Arkansas orphanage where the conditions were difficult and the discipline severe. Finch, small for his age, was bullied, and boys were frequently whipped and denied meals.

A change in leadership to Dr. Louis B. Snider vastly improved Finch’s quality of life, and Finch eventually came with Snider’s family to Lake Villa, Ill., when Snider took a position at what is today One Hope United. Finch has fond memories of life on campus, which included group meals, singing, riding horses, and tending to chickens. “The expansiveness of this place, and the lake—it was paradise,” he recalls. “This was a growth time. It felt good. You liked yourself. Somebody else liked you.”

“Ermit personifies One Hope United’s vision: For every child and family, a life without limits,” said President and CEO Charles A. Monotorio-Archer. “His story speaks to the potential in each of us to overcome hardship and trauma when we have the right support. I’m thrilled to recognize him with the dedication of the Ermit L. Finch Campus at Lake Villa.”

The support Finch received at One Hope United led Finch to academic and personal success. While on campus, he learned to read and graduated from Antioch High School, where he played tuba in the marching band. He went on to attend the University of Illinois and the University of Chicago, returning to the campus in the summers to live and work. He would raise his own family and lead a successful business career in heating, air conditioning and residential construction.

“Ermit’s undefeatable, unbreakable, and unstoppable spirit has been an unending source of inspiration at One Hope United,” said Board Chair Theresa A. Dear.

In 2003, Finch revisited the campus and resumed his connection to the place where he spent the happiest years of his childhood. He joined the Board of Directors of One Hope United in 2004, the first former resident to do so.

“It was a blessing to be exposed and to have the opportunity” to live and thrive on the campus, Finch said at the ceremony. “I’m wonderfully honored.”

One Hope United has operated the Ermit L. Finch campus since 1948. Today it is home to the CARE Residential Program, which serves as many as 50 young boys and teenagers between the ages of 9 to 18 years old who don’t have a biological or foster family to live with. The campus also includes a Therapeutic Day School, attended by young men from the campus and the surrounding communities.

One Hope United’s 5th Annual Gala, Hope In Action: Why I Have Hope

One Hope United’s 5th Annual Gala, Hope In Action: Why I Have Hope, Features The Glee Project Alum Mario Bonds, May 3, 2019 at Hilton Chicago.

Guests will hear inspiring stories of hope and courage while enjoying a night of entertainment, dining and giving back.

CHICAGO — One Hope United, one of the country’s leading human services nonprofits, presents its 5th Annual Hope In Action gala, Friday, May 3, 2019 at the Hilton Chicago, featuring Mario Bonds, a national entertainer whose life symbolizes the meaning of hope. The 6 p.m. Why I Have Hope gala (5:30 p.m. VIP reception) is in the Hilton’s Grand Ballroom, 720 S. Michigan Ave.,. Tickets available at http://www.onehopeunited.org/hopeinaction.

Blind by the age of 10 and a survivor of childhood trauma, Mario Bonds is a motivational speaker, published author, singer-songwriter, and breakout star of NBC Universal’s The Glee Project.  Bonds’ unforgettable and powerful performance in song is living proof of how anyone can rise to meet any challenge.

Born with a degenerative condition that destroyed his eyesight, Bonds faced abuse, homelessness, and abandonment, yet, he never suffered from hopelessness. In his memoir, Without Sight but Full of Vision, Bonds describes how through hard work, perseverance, and personal responsibility we can all become “master of our destinies.” Bonds, who was adopted at the age of 16, is a licensed foster care provider in the process of adopting two teenage boys.

Also during Hope In Action: Why I Have Hope, One Hope United will honor extraordinary individuals who support the organization’s mission to provide every family and every child a “life without limits.”

They include 96-year-old volunteer Nannie Crudup, honored with the fifth annual Ermit Finch Impact Award.  Crudup is one of One Hope United’s most committed volunteers, giving her time nearly every school day for the past 26 years, helping the staff and three- to five-year-old children at One Hope United’s Bridgeport Child Development Center.

Patrick Kingston, Customer Development Manager at Tyson Foods will be recognized with One Hope United’s Chairwoman’s Award for his commitment to community advancement, empowering nonprofits, and inspiring leadership. Veteran One Hope United executive Todd Schultz, President of Restoration Ministries, will be honored with The President’s Award for his commitment to nonprofit stability, transparency, and leadership.

Guests at Hope In Action: Why I Have Hope will enjoy cocktails, a seated dinner, and the chance to bid on a wide variety of auction items. VIP ticket holders can meet Mario Bonds at a private reception preceding the gala.

“One Hope United is thrilled to welcome Mario Bonds, who understands the challenges and traumas that many of our clients face, and whose resilience is an inspiration and a testament to the types of services we provide,” says new President and CEO Dr. Charles A. Montorio-Archer.

“We’re also excited to add a new twist this year by debuting Hope After Dark, immediately following our gala at Hilton Chicago,” Montorio-Archer adds. “The after-event experience is the perfect complement to Hope In Action for supporters who might not typically attend a gala but love dressing up for a great cause.”

Hope After Dark, from 10 p.m. to midnight, is presented by One Hope United’s Chicago Ambassador Board and features a selection of beers, wines and cocktails, as well as live house and dance music provided by DJ Lady D. Hope After Dark tickets ($100) can be purchased in advance at https://onehopeunited.org/hopeafterdark, or when guests arrive at the Hilton Chicago Grand Ballroom. All tickets for the Hope In Action: Why I Have Hope Gala ($300, $400 VIP) include admission to Hope After Dark.

“Many young professionals have told us they want to support our event, while at the same time living within their charitable giving budgets,” says Mike Carpenter, One Hope United’s Chicago Ambassador Board Chair. “The Hope After Dark party appeals to a new and broader audience of donors and we hope it will become one of the highlights of the Spring gala season.”

WCIU TV reporter and host Jon Hansen will serve as Hope In Action’s Master of Ceremonies. Hansen is an Emmy-nominated reporter and a talk show host for WGN 720 AM and can be seen on WCIU’s The Jam and Now.Chicago.

Tickets for Hope in Action: Why I Have Hope are available here.

Tickets for Hope After Dark are available here.

One Hope United would like to thank the following Why I Have Hope sponsors for their support:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daniel George Architects          Grant Staff, Inc.       Michelle Damico Communications           StrateBen         Ultimate Software

Continental Benefits.       Terra Properties               WT Group

 

About One Hope United
One Hope United is a private human service organization that offers a diverse array of prevention, intervention and community-based programs including early education, foster care, adoption, residential, and other support services. What began in 1895 as a children’s home in Chicago now serves 9,000 children and families each year in Illinois, Wisconsin, Missouri, and Florida and employs nearly 800 passionate and talented professionals. For more information, please visit http://www.onehopeunited.org.