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One Hope United Pilots Free Clothing Store for Children in Foster Care

Lake Villa, Ill. (Jan. 27, 2023)–One Hope United launched its first “Hope Closet” event on Dec. 28 at boy’s residential campus, Ermit L. Finch Campus at Lake Villa. Clothes, shoes, and winter wear were donated to the organization by Indiana nonprofit, Cross Border Partners.

The private pop-up event gave the young boys in foster care a free shopping experience including a personal shopper to help find items among the hundreds of options that fit the boy’s personal tastes. Many of the volunteers at the “Hope Closet” pop-up event were actually board members, including one of One Hope United’s newest, Jeremy Harvey.

Harvey, a State and Territory Liaison at ICF, joined the nonprofit’s board in 2022, becoming the second former One Hope United foster child to join the organization’s Board of Directors.

“I’ve had the feeling many other youth in foster care have of being unworthy or unwanted. If a small thing I can do is to gather clothes, donate them back to One Hope United so that we have a closet of hope so that young people feel worthy of healing, growth, and development… it’s just one little thing I can do,” Harvey said.

There are no statistics on how many children enter foster care with only the clothing they are wearing, but it is a common reality reported by foster parents and foster care organizations. With clothing stipends in Illinois under $80 a month and the rising costs of goods, the clothing stipend often only covers a single new outfit.

“This event is the epitome of what is at the core of OHU – a deep commitment to be responsible and to advocate for those in our care. Volunteers, staff, and our nonprofit partner selflessly showed up to support the children we serve. We couldn’t be more grateful,” said Dr. Damon Cates, Chief Advancement Officer at One Hope United.

Harvey’s involvement in the “Hope Closet” project was spurred after attending fellow board member, Cindy Miller-Lusignan’s, annual fundraising event and hearing about One Hope United’s need for clothing. Harvey turned to his own network on social media and asked friends, colleagues, and family to donate shirts, pants, suits, and shoes to the organization, even offering to collect donations personally.

“I’ve had this experience. I know what this feels like. I knew I had to do something. I’m not rich so I can’t write a check and solve a problem, but I can absolutely reach out to my network and ask ‘Do you have things that you can donate?’ I want to help other young people with these experiences feel seen, feel important,” Harvey said.

Within days, Harvey’s call to action gained momentum online and he was introduced to Cross Border Partners. After learning about the need at One Hope United, Cross Border Partners delivered a 16-foot truck filled with clothing to join the 80 bags of donations Harvey and other board members collected for the girls and boys in foster care.

“Young people need to feel like they’re worthy of healing. When you show up with just the things on your back, in a space full of strangers, and add to that, that this is unlikely to be your first placement… this is probably your 15th, 16th, 17th stop. You’re feeling so many ways. Our Hope Closet is one small step we can make to say you’re worthy! You are worthy of clean, age-appropriate, stylish clothes… We see you,” Harvey said.

Additional “Hope Closet” pop-up events are being scheduled for the foster care programs at One Hope United and the organization continues to accept donations.

“There’s lots of ways folks can give to make an impact for our kids. There’s no gift too big or too small. We’re looking for time, talent, and treasure. Maybe you don’t have any money, but you can volunteer a couple of hours and just spend time with our kids,” Harvey said.

 

About One Hope United

Founded in 1895, One Hope United is a multi-state nonprofit that helps children and families build the skills to live life without limits. OHU serves over 10,000 children and families each year through education centers, child and family services, counseling, and residential programs. Using evidence-based and trauma-informed practices, OHU empowers children and families to see and create a future where, regardless of their past, they can reach their full potential.

About Cross Border Partners

Cross Border Partners is a 501(c)3 nonprofit Christian organization which helps those in need. The organization accepts donations of anything but food. These items are then redistributed to those in need. The organization also offers items for sale that is open to the public. After paying operating expenses, any extra funds are used to purchase items to help the voucher clients.

Executive’s Corner

Friends, 

Since our last update, One Hope United has held several events, and we have several more this year. You can view those on OHU’s website 

Our 31st Annual Golf Outing was on September 20, and because of generous sponsors and donors, we were able to raise over $137,000 to support our programs and services. You can view pictures of the event here, and I hope you will save the date for next year’s golf outing, which will be held on September 19, 2023.  

Every year, we have an Annual Community Meeting, sharing details around organizational operations and growth. As we have for the past two years, we held the meeting virtually, and discussed our Hope House projects in Florida, exciting news about expanding an early learning center, and shared how our Behavioral Health line of service is supporting the new national mental health hotline. I was joined by Dr. Blair Kiser, Social Current’s Senior Director of Government of Affairs, who discussed the importance of advocacy in the child welfare sector, and One Hope United’s Executive Cabinet came together with me to answer questions from attendees. If you were not able to attend the event, you can view the video here 

As we head into the last quarter of 2022, we have started planning for the upcoming legislative sessions in Florida and Illinois. Building on the plan we launched last year, we will be seeking funding in Florida for program growth, and I look forward to engaging with our elected representatives again during the session.  

Thank you for supporting our life-changing work.  

United In Hope, 

Dr. Charles A. Montorio-Archer, President and CEO

 

Hope for the Holidays

“Someday, I want my kids to live in a house like this,” Michael said, looking around at the three-story renovated home for the first time.

Michael had just toured One Hope United’s new residential home, called Hope House, in Fort Lauderdale. He told house parents he had never stepped foot in a place like this before. Dancing around, he confidently stated he wants to do what’s right, so he can live somewhere like this when he grows up.

Before moving into Hope House, Michael faced many struggles. Michael is a dually involved teenager, which means he’s interacted with both the child welfare and juvenile detention systems in his young life. Dually involved young people often face a high level of difficulty obtaining a placement in foster care, significant barriers to achieving permanency and are at a higher risk for lengthy stays in detention facilities.

Hope House is uniquely positioned to serve young people aged 14-17 like Michael. The staff ratio at Hope House is 4:1, which means more individualized attention from house parents. In choosing a property, Sarah Tunning, Executive Director of OHU’s services in Florida, wanted to provide “a really nice home environment for the young men, first and foremost.”

One Hope United focuses on making sure the environment at Hope House is not only inclusive, but it sets youth up for success. For example, when a young person is placed at Hope House, they first go to a local retail store with one of their house parents, so they can choose the right hygiene products for their unique skin and hair needs. In other group home or foster care placements, these young men may have had to use whatever personal care products were on hand in the home, even if it irritated their skin or wasn’t right for their hair. Then, they go out to dinner with a house parent, where they discuss strategies that will help them grow and develop in the coming months.

After they settle into their new home, these young men focus on independent living skills like improving academic performance, getting a part-time job, and opening a savings account. “Our goal is that when these young men turn 18, they’re on a college or career path, and they’ve strengthened healthy relationships with their family members and mentors in the area,” Sarah shared.

Sarah has noticed strong connections forming already between the youth currently living at Hope House. Two of the young men living in the house, Matthew and Ben, developed a strong friendship in just a few weeks. When Matthew had a mental health episode and had to go to the hospital, Ben made sure to look after his things while he was gone.

“These are kids that are used to fighting for everything,” Sarah said. “We want them to feel they are safe here, and to know their house parents really care about them.”

To celebrate the holidays, the young men living at Hope House will enjoy a special meal prepared by their house dad who loves to cook. Then, they’ll play board games together in the living room, lit by their Christmas tree.

You can purchase specific items requested by house parents and the young men living at Hope House here. You can also learn about our other residential programs at this link.

*names of the young men living at Hope House have been changed to protect privacy. 

SUPPORT HOPE HOUSE   OHU RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMS

National Adoption Month 2020

November is National Adoption Month

November is Adoption Awareness Month. You may be surprised to learn that although no more than 2% of Americans are adopted, over 1/3 of Americans have considered adopting a child. Whether you’ve thought about adopting a child, have been personally affected by adoption or are simply interested in the topic, November is the perfect time to learn more.

Common Misconceptions About Adoption

There are many misconceptions about what adoption is really like. Below, you’ll find a few common misunderstandings about the process.

Adopted children are not wanted by their birth parents.

The idea that when a parent places a child up for adoption they are giving up, or giving up on, their child is simply not true. Placing a child up for adoption is a show of unconditional love by the child’s birth parents. They want to provide a better life for their child than they are currently able to offer, and even though the decision is painful, they make the sacrifice to create a happy, healthy future for their child.

Adopted children shouldn’t be told they are adopted.

In an interview with CBS news, Adam Pertman, author of “American Adoption,” said, “My favorite story is of a social worker friend who was asked by a couple, whom she handed a brand-new baby, and they whispered to her, ‘When do we tell her she’s adopted?’ Why are they whispering in front of a five-day-old baby is another question. My friend says to them, ‘On the way out.’ And that is the right answer. We keep secrets of things we are ashamed of and embarrassed about. We should never be ashamed of our children or our families.”

In the 1970s, most parents didn’t tell their adopted child about their family history. However, some research has shown that after a certain age, finding this information can have an adverse impact on a person’s mental health. A study conducted in 2019 found those in the earliest age group of adoption discovery, birth to 2 years of age, reported both the least distress and the highest level of life satisfaction.

If you’re unsure of when or whether to tell your adopted child they are adopted, speaking with an adoption counselor can help. Contact One Hope United for more information.

Infants are the largest group of children waiting to be adopted.

The average age of a child waiting to be adopted is 7.7 years old, and 29% of them will spend at least three years in foster care. In certain states, including Illinois, adoptive parents must first become licensed as foster care parents, and foster a child for at least 6 months before adopting them. While there are many infants in need of loving homes, older children in foster care are in the same position.

When parents adopt a youth in care through a One Hope United program, they work closely with a Case Manager to ensure all needs of the child in care are met prior to adoption completion. Parents who adopt through an OHU program report finding fulfillment from growing their families and providing unconditional love, safety and security. A parent who adopted through a One Hope United program in our Florida region shared this quote:

“We met our son at a One Hope United teen match event, and there was an almost instant bond. We decided to adopt him. Not every day was easy at first, but we were able to build a loving home based on mutual respect and empathy. Now, he’s getting ready for his senior year at the University of Miami. We’re so proud of all he has accomplished.”

Benefits of Adoption

“I would say being an adoptive father has made me a more empathetic and thoughtful person. I raised a beautiful young woman, and as a result, I am a more insightful, understanding, and well-rounded.” – Jim Webster, Data Analyst, One Hope United

Adoption benefits families just as much as adopted children. Adoption allows thousands of loving couples to become parents each year. And children who gain a sibling through adoption add a loving family member to grow and learn with throughout their lives.

And, of course, children who are adopted benefit from finding their forever home. Dittrich also shared, “Most children that find their forever home blossom into thriving young adults and can demonstrate that love to their children, thus creating a beautiful cycle of acceptance, understanding and love.” In fact, a report titled Adoption USA found that 85 percent of children who are adopted are in excellent or very good health, and that adopted children were less likely to live in households below the poverty threshold.

How to Celebrate National Adoption Month

Re-telling your child’s adoption story to them and reflecting on favorite family memories are two great ways to celebrate National Adoption Month. You can also spread awareness through social media, find community events in your area, and educate friends and family members about adoption. If you are interested in adopting, contact One Hope United. You can also learn more about adopting through a One Hope United program here.

NATIONAL ADOPTION MONTH SOCIAL MEDIA TOOLKIT

One Hope United Adds COO to Leadership Team

One Hope United has announced that on March 2nd, Antwan Turpeau will join the organization as Chief Operating Officer.

Antwan Turpeau has served as an Associate Deputy Director within the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services, since February 2017, creating the Office of Delinquency Prevention. In that role, he oversaw the Shelter System, Human Trafficking Unit, and Dually Involved Youth Unit. Prior to his service at DCFS, Turpeau founded the nonprofit organization, Struggling Youth Equals Successful Adults, that focused on keeping older foster youth connected to support and resources through the age of 25.

“Antwan brings a personal passion, academic achievement, and many years of program delivery experience to One Hope United,” said Dr. Charles A. Montorio-Archer, President and CEO of One Hope United. “We are very fortunate to have him join our leadership team and lend his expertise to our agency’s strategic direction.”

At OHU, Turpeau will lead its Residential/Day Treatment Services, Early Learning and Child Development programs, Counseling, Community Based Family Services and One Hope United’s Florida operations, serving nearly 10,000 children and youth in Florida, Illinois, Missouri and Wisconsin.

“I am very excited about being a member of the One Hope United team and family,” Antwan Turpeau said. “Charles’s vision for One Hope United inspired me to join the effort to use the organization’s 125-year-old foundation to build up and advance the children, families and staff we serve at OHU. It is my passion to work relentlessly to improve the quality of life of others who are in need of equal opportunities, excellent educational experiences, and high performing community-based services.”

Turpeau earned his Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Elmhurst College and a Master of Social Work from Loyola University. In 2014, he was honored with Loyola’s Damen Award as social worker of the year.

A Black History Month Message From Our President and CEO, Dr. Charles A. Montorio-Archer

“A people without knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots.” Marcus Garvey

Since 1976, every U.S. President has officially designated the month of February as Black History Month. This is a time dedicated to reflecting and publicly thanking those African-Americans who have gone before us – showing strength and perseverance for what is right.

We are grateful for our ancestors’ optimistic attitudes, which were difficult to maintain during extremely challenging times in our history. Optimism and believing that things were going to be better have enabled us to move forward toward change. Our ability to believe in ourselves to overcome adversity has been a strength and testament of our will.

Black History is not just about learning about the challenges we as a people have been through. It is about our ability to have integrity, leadership, and determination in the face of our struggles.  Crisis does not necessarily make character, but it certainly helps to reveal it. Adversity creates strength in character and determination. A lesson to learn and celebrate as we chart our continued progress.

Black History month provides us with a moment to celebrate and rejoice in the tremendous changes we have experienced. At the same time, it is imperative that we recommit and learn from our past as to what has worked successfully so we can clearly identify what we still need to do. We want to take our rich history and reach beyond to inspire the next generations to continue to create and sustain positive change. This applies to working in human services- such as providing foster care, adoption, and other family and children support services.

As the President and CEO of a non-profit that serves over 10,000 diverse children and families, I am wholeheartedly determined to effect positive change. We must demand equity for all – regardless of race, ethnicity, different abilities, sexual orientation, or family composition. We all have the same inalienable rights and working together we can continue to achieve momentous success.  We at One Hope United are taking the opportunity to start the dialog about diversity and inclusion, at the upcoming Hope Academy sessions for our staff members.

As I look at areas that affect the populations who we serve at One Hope United, there has been some progress made for Black children in foster care. From 2007 to 2017, according to the Child Welfare Foster Care Statistics report published in 2017:

  • The number of Black children in foster care dropped from 31% to 23%
  • The number of Black children entering foster care dropped from 26% to 21%
  • However, the rate of Black children exiting foster care during the same 10-year period, dropped from 27% to 21%

In the education sector, according to a report from the Postsecondary National Policy Institute:

  • For Blacks, aged 25 to 29, only 23% held a bachelor’s degree in 2018, a growth of only 5% from 2000. In comparison, white students aged 25 to 29, during that same period, the number of who attained a bachelor’s degree, rose from 34% to 44%.

Along with foster care, and education, poverty is another area of concern. The poverty rate among Blacks is the highest of any racial or ethnic group; in 2018, the rate of poverty was 20.8%, according to census data. By comparison, the overall U.S. poverty rate in 2018 was 11.8%.

Representation in executive leadership is another area where we are under-represented. In a report from Race to Lead, published in 2017, less than 20% of nonprofits are led by people of color. And, only 3.2% of senior leadership roles at large companies in the U.S. are filled by Black people.

As African Americans we have come together to improve our communities and cities. There is still much to do. In our uncertain world, I take the challenge personally and professionally to accelerate change through respect and collaboration. I believe that success can be achieved with consensus leadership. Through partnerships, associations, collaborations, and teamwork- we increase our value together to unify and succeed.

Black History month still matters. Celebrating and studying Black History is part of American History. It is critical to our understanding our progress as a nation, recommitting ourselves and our leadership to celebrating and effecting positive change to making the world a better place for all. It is time to realize that the recognition of our history shouldn’t be limited to one month but celebrated year-round.

One Hope United Hosts ‘Foster Boy’ Screening and Talkback

One Hope United partnered last week with attorney and producer/writer Jay Paul Deratany to host a screening of his new film, Foster Boy, followed by a talkback and reception.

Foster Boy tells the story of an African American teenager who was physically and sexually abused by an older foster care teen after the two were placed in the same home by a for-profit foster care company.

View the event photos on our Facebook page here

As a nonprofit agency providing foster care services, One Hope United hosted the screening to share the powerful film with its supporters and bring attention to the danger that arises when organizations put profits ahead of children’s well-being.

“A child is not a commodity,” Deratany told a capacity audience at the Pritzker Military Museum and Library. “You have to give a kid a chance. You have to give them some hope.”

The movie was inspired by three true foster care abuse cases in which Deratany was involved and stars Matthew Modine as the attorney and Academy Award-winner Louis Gossett Jr. as the judge. Basketball legend Shaquille O’Neal, a child advocate himself who took a special interest in the movie’s topic, is an executive producer.

In the talkback, moderator Charles A. Montorio-Archer, President and CEO of One Hope United, asked Deratany about the role of the arts in raising awareness about this and other serious topics.

“We have to tell stories of abuse, we have to tell stories about racial prejudice, we have to tell stories that bring us back together as a country, that unite us again,” Deratany answered. We have to come together to conquer some of the problems that we have.”

Melissa Webster, One Hope United’s Executive Director of Residential and Day Treatment Services, spoke on the panel about the film’s realistic depiction of the effects of trauma on youth.

“One thing that trauma robs from kids is that sense that they have a future,” said Webster. “A big part of what we do is help them find that hope so they can start to see that they’re going to have a future as well, that they have a chance to have a different kind of life.”

“One Hope United does some great work,” Deratany said. “We have to give recognition to a great group like this, because we need to continue to fight for our kids.”

To support children in foster care who have experienced trauma, you may donate to One Hope United here.

 

More Information

Become a One Hope United foster parent.

Visit the Foster Boy website.

Read an interview with Jay Paul Deratany.

Watch a video from the event.

Pathfinders Helps Preschooler Heal From Exposure To Domestic Abuse

Innovative therapeutic program helps preschool children cope with difficult emotions and lead more positive lives.

When Lucy*, 5, first arrived at One Hope United’s Elgin Child & Family Resource Center, she was extremely sensitive to loud noises, covering her ears and experiencing severe anxiety whenever another child would cry out—which, at a child care center, can be often. When she was frustrated or experienced even the slightest discipline, “she would scream at the top of her lungs, as if she were afraid for her life,” pounding on the wall and stomping her feet, her mother, Krista*, explains. “I knew right away I needed help.”

Lucy’s behavior was related to traumas she had experienced as a very young child. She witnessed physical abuse by her biological father toward her mother, and while he never physically harmed Lucy, when she would have tantrums as a 2- and 3-year-old, hewould rush toward her with raised fists in an attempt to make herto stop. “She went through a lot,” Krista says.

While those traumas were fortunately in the past, their effects were disrupting Lucy’s education and potentially that of her classmates. In addition, adverse childhood experiences can have long-term effects on children’s health, behavior, and life potential. It’s for children like Lucy that One Hope United began Pathfinders, a unique program that combines aspects of our family counseling programs with our early childhood education centers to help children cope with negative emotions and adopt healthier behaviors.

Pathfinders therapist Tara Cassidy says the program is a collaboration with the child, their family, and their teacher.

Sometimes it’s the teacher who notices an issue and alerts Tara, who will then engage the child’s family to offer support, which is covered through private insurance or Medicaid. She will observe and engage with the child in the classroom, with their family, and in individual sessions, and craft a treatment plan that often involves the family due to the child’s young age. The evidence-based treatment is called Attachment, Self-Regulation, and Competency.

One boy who was predisposed to depression learned deep breathing and created a book of coping skills. “On one page he put all the things that he liked to do, so if he was feeling down, he could just go in his book and see, ‘I could go ride my bike,I could go take a walk,’ things that would help him get out of a low mood,” Tara says.

Another child who struggled with tantrums learned to express her emotions and tell her loved ones why she was upset. Her coping skills included coloring and walking the dog—a therapy dog that was part of her treatment. Tara also taught her family to recognize when the girl needed help and step in with an activity. “Because they’re so young, sometimes they don’t just say, ‘I need to go use a coping skill,’” she says.

It’s important to make the sessions and treatment fun so the kids will want to continue. “They may think we’re just playing, but we’re really doing therapy,” Tara says. “If they don’t have fun, they won’t want to be there, and they won’t learn as much. People learn better when they’re enjoying it.”

Krista says that Lucy is “a completely different little girl” as a result of Pathfinders. Through the program, Lucy has increased her self-esteem, developed confidence, grown more talkative,made more friends, and no longer covers her ears at loud noises. “I can’t say enough how amazing the program has been for my daughter. It changed her life and gave her the chance for a much better life altogether.”

Pathfinders is also offered One Hope United’s Aurora Early Learning Center and Joliet Early Learning Center, and could expand to more, which Tara would be happy to see. “This is the first program I’ve been in where the kids are so little, and it’s great,” she says. “The earlier you help them, the better off they’ll be.”

*Name has been changed.

One Hope United Honored at 2019 Illinois Centennial Awards

JACKSONVILLE, IL – As we prepare to enter our 125th year,  One Hope United was honored at Illinois State Historical Society’s 35th annual Centennial Business Awards luncheon at Jacksonville’s Hamilton’s Catering and banquet hall facility.

“It is an honor and privilege to recognize and celebrate the achievement of these unique businesses and organizations that have achieved the centennial milestone,” said ISHS executive director William Furry. “Fewer than 10 percent of all corporations survive 100 years, and those that do have done so with great sacrifice. They have also persevered economic downturns, recessions, personal losses, and enormous changes in the industry. Their resilience, and not a little luck, made all the difference. To each of them, we extend our best wishes for the next 100 years.”
Representatives from each of the recipients Centennial Award businesses received a certificate with the ISHS Centennial Seal signed by President Dan Monroe and Executive Director William Furry. Tim Snowden, Executive Director for Community Based Family Services, accepted the award on One Hope United’s behalf.

Other businesses that received the Centennial Business Award for 2019 are:

Schmale Insurance Company
Loyola Press
American Legion Post 279
Bound to Stay Bound Books
Hamilton’s Catering
Routt Catholic High School
Western Illinois University
Petersburg Monument Company
Blessing-Rieman College of Nursing and Health Sciences
Rock Island Public Library
The Village of Rochester
Illinois Education Association
Cover Insurance Company
Stark County Old Settlers Association
Wyoming Monument Company
Chisolm Boyd, & White Company
State Bank of Lakes
J.C. Schultz Enterprises, Inc.
Egyptian Workplace Partners
U.A.S. Local 99 Plumbers and Pipefitters
Buena Vista National Bank
House of Glunz
Fox River Grove
Mason County Democrat
Zenith Electronics, L.L.C.
Roseview Flowers
H.J. Eppel and Company, Inc.
Anderson’s Candy Company, Inc.
Scot Forge
Randolph Mutual Insurance

About One Hope United

One Hope United is a private human service organization that offers a diverse array of prevention, intervention and community-based programs including early education, foster care, adoption, residential, and other support services. What began in 1895 as a children’s home in suburban Chicago now serves 10,000 children and families each year in Illinois, Wisconsin, Missouri, and Florida and employs nearly 800 passionate and talented professionals. For more information, please visit http://www.onehopeunited.org.

75 Champaign-Area Youth to Receive Foster Care Services Through One Hope United

ABOVE: (From Left to Right) One Hope United Champaign employees Carla Bradford, Elizabeth Stonum, Karen Kietzmann, Katie Arnold, Laken Waltz and Myriam Molina

CHAMPAIGN, IL – One Hope United is now providing foster care services to 75 youth in four Central Illinois Counties,  to ensure they are properly cared for in their transitional foster home and to help them achieve a permanent home, whether they are returned their birth parents, another guardian, or an adoptive family. The new services cover the counties of Champaign, Ford, Iroquois, and Vermilion.

One Hope United, with offices throughout Illinois, Missouri, Wisconsin and Florida, is widely respected throughout Central Illinois as a high-quality provider of foster care services, including its strong track record of helping youth find permanent homes. In nearby Charleston, where One Hope United has provided services for decades, the organization currently exceeds the goals set by child welfare officials to find permanent families for youth in foster care.

To encourage potential foster parents to learn about One Hope United, the organization is welcoming the community to an Open House on Friday, August 2nd, from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. at 1902 Fox Drive, Suite E, Champaign, Illinois (217-850-0500). Community members are invited to drop in, meet the staff, enjoy light refreshments, and learn more about the services, including the process of becoming a foster parent or family.

“There is a shortage of foster parents nationwide, and we want to encourage more individuals and couples to become foster moms and dads,” said Charles A. Montorio-Archer, President and CEO of One Hope United.  “Our new presence in the Champaign area reflects our vision: For every child and family, a life without limits,” said Montorio-Archer.

“Foster parents play an indispensable role in helping our children reach permanency,” says Lindsey Hoover, director of One Hope United’s foster care programs in Charleston and now Champaign. “Through their patience, love and compassion, they provide a safe and secure environment for the children we serve.” Foster parents may also be a permanency option themselves, Hoover adds, as foster care can be a path to adoption.

Champaign-area individuals and families interested in fostering who cannot attend the open house should contact One Hope United’s licensing manager, Myriam Molina, at mmolina1@onehopeunited.org or 217-508-6388.

To get acquainted with area residents, One Hope United employees, supporters, and youth will participate in Run Mahomet on Saturday, August 3, 2019. For the second straight year, the “Run Hope United” team will run the race benefitting the Mahomet Area Youth Club.

“Last year’s ‘Run Hope United’ was a great way for the One Hope United community to bond while supporting a cause that we all believe in – children,” says Tim Snowden, Executive Director of Community-Based Family Services, which include foster care. “We are thrilled to be participating in Run Mahomet for the second year, this time as a service provider in the community.”

Race attendees and spectators are encouraged to say hello to the Run Hope United team and learn how they can support area children through the organization’s foster care program.

About One Hope United

One Hope United is a private human service organization that offers a diverse array of prevention, intervention and community-based programs including early education, foster care, adoption, residential, and other support services. What began in 1895 as a children’s home in suburban Chicago now serves 9,000 children and families each year in Illinois, Wisconsin, Missouri, and Florida and employs nearly 800 passionate and talented professionals. For more information, please visit http://www.onehopeunited.org.

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